< Homepage

Classic Aviation Ads: The Second Everest Flight 1933

 

Everest Flight > Everest Home

Houston Everest Flight Ads
Bristol Pegasus
Bristol Pegasus
Bristol Pegasus
Bristol Pegasus
Bristol Pegasus
BTH Magnetos
Castrol Oil
Castrol Oil
Castrol Oil
De Havilland Gipsy
First Over Everest Book
Ilford Photo Plates
KLG Spark Plugs
Luxor Goggles
Smiths Drift Sight
Summit Photo From Aircraft
The Airscrew Co Flight Cover
The Airscrew Company
The Airscrew Company
Westland Aircraft
Westland Aircraft
Westland Wallace
Westland Wallace
Westland Wallace

Houston Everest Flight Articles
Chronology Of The Everest Flights
The Westland Wallace
The Houston Westland Aircraft
Everest Bristol Pegasus S.3
The Everest Flight Cameras
Pre Expedition Proving Tests
Departing For Everest
Members Of The Expedition
Everest Conquered
The Second Flight
The Everest Year
The Times Luncheon

 


The Second Flight Over Everest (Flight Article May 4th 1933)

HE NORTH-EAST SLOPE OF EVEREST, LOOKING ALONG THE CLIMBER'S PATH :

THE NORTH-EAST SLOPE OF EVEREST, LOOKING ALONG THE CLIMBER'S PATH :
This Times photograph, was taken on an Ilford panchromatic plate.

Insubordination appears to have been indulged in by the Houston-Everest Flight in making a second attack on the world's highest point. On April 19, in definite defiance of orders from home, the two Westland machines made another flight to the summit of Mount Everest. The Houston-Westland was manned by Lord Clydesdale and Col. Blacker. and the Westland-Wallace by FIt.Lt. MacIntyre and Mr. A. L. Fisher, one of the cinematographers of the Gaumont-British Film Corporation.

The object of the second flight, as far as Lord Clydesdale's machine was concerned, was to obtain a series of overlapping vertical pictures which should provide a-complete survey of the whole strip of country towards the summit of Everest, and Mr. Fisher was taking films almost continuously. Col. Blacker also took oblique photographs as well as the survey strips, and it is now considered that the expedition has amply fulfilled the objects for which it went out to India.

In this issue of FLIGHT we publish,-by special arrangement with The Times, two of the photographs taken on the first flight over Mount Everest. These were, we understand, taken on Ilford panchromatic plates, and it will be noted that in one particularly the sky has ph otographed verv dark, which seems to indicate that a red filter was used .

The expedition is also believed to have secured some long-distance photographs on Ilford infra-red plates, but these have not yet reached this country.
On the last flight the Williamson automatic camera appears to have worked perfectly in spite of the intense cold at the altitude at which most of the photographs were taken .It is almost superfluous to say that both the Westland machines and Bristol " Pegasus" engines did their share in an irreproachable manner. The two Westland machines used by the expedition are, it will be remembered, of the " Wallace " type, or, rather, one is a standard "Wallace" with all military equipment removed, while the other, the Houston-Westland, is very similar.


For Web presentation purposes all 'ads have been grey scaled, sized to approx 500 pixels as low res images to reduce bandwidth. If you would like a high res copy of any of these for printing or to make a poster for example please ask. Email:info@content-delivery.co.uk